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Table 3 Correlations among perceptions of “clean” diets and indicators of eating disorder relevant symptomatology

From: Is #cleaneating a healthy or harmful dietary strategy? Perceptions of clean eating and associations with disordered eating among young adults

  Perceived cleanliness Perceived healthiness Willingness to adopt EDE-QS EHQ OCI-R WBIS-M MBSRQ_
AS_BASS
MBSRQ_
AS_OP
Perceived cleanliness         
Perceived healthiness .84***        
Willingness to adopt .57*** .62***       
EDE-QS .30** .32*** .41***      
EHQ .33*** .35*** .61*** .46***     
OCIR .13 .12 .05 .20* .07    
WBIS-M .15 .19* .16 .68*** .24* .11   
MBSRQ-AS-BASS .06 .02 .07 −.43*** .01 −.16 −.69***  
MBSRQ-AS-OP .26** .28** .41*** .80*** .46*** .09 .56*** −.33***
  1. Note. *p < .05; **p < .01; ***p < .001. Scores for perceived cleanliness, perceived healthiness, and willingness to adopt the presented diets were averaged across all five “clean” diet vignettes. EDE-QS is the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire Short; EHQ is the Eating Habits Questionnaire; OCI-R is the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised; WBIS-M is the Weight Bias Internalization Scale – Modified; MBSRQ-AS-BASS and MBSRQ-AS-OP are the Body Areas Satisfaction and Overweight Preoccupation subscales from the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire Appearance Scales, respectively. Participants who completed the survey in less than 20 min (n = 5) or incorrectly responded to the attention check questions for the vignettes (n = 38) were excluded from the correlation analyses