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Table 1 Characterization of the studied groups by training time, anthropometric nutritional variables and body composition

From: Amateur ballet practicing, body image and eating behaviors: a comparative study of classical ballet dancers, gym users and sedentary women

Variables Total Ballet dancers Gym users Sedentary women p, F (df), p, ηp2or H (df), p, ηp2
Mdn (Q1–Q3)
or
M (SD)
Mdn (Q1–Q3)
or
M (SD)
Mdn (Q1–Q3)
or
M (SD)
Mdn (Q1–Q3)
or
M (SD)
Age (years) 25.0 (20.5–29.0) 24.0 (20.0–29.0) 25.0 (23.0–30.0) 25.0 (20.0–37.0) .461
Practice time (years) 3.0 (1.0–14.3) 14.0 (6.0–17.0) 1.0 (0.5–2.0)  < .0005
Training time (hours/week) 5.0 (3.0–8.0) 7.5 (6.0–10.0) 3.0 (3.0–5.0)  < .0005
Body mass index (Kg/m2) 22.0 (2.9) 20.9 (2.4)* 22.1 (2.4) 23.2 (3.5) 3.41 (2, 53), .04, .11
Body fat (%) 34.4 (30.3–38.9) 31.2 (21.6–34.4)** 34.3 (30.2–38.3) 38.9 (34.2–42.2) .002
Femoral neck BMD (Z-scores) 0.0 (0.8) 0.2 (1.2) − 0.2 (0.6) 0.1 (0.6) .153
  1. Non-parametric data were analyzed using the Kruskal–Wallis H test, followed by the Dunn post-hoc test with effect size assessed by the eta-squared (η2) and the Mann Whitney U test with effect size assessed by Cohen’s d. Parametric data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA F test, followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test with effect size assessed by partial eta-squared ηp2.
  2. BMD bone mineral density
  3. *Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test, p = .031. **Dunn’s post-hoc test, p = .002