Skip to main content

Table 1 Means, standard deviations and correlation coefficient for SFF and EDE-Q scores as well as the seven individual SFF items used in Study 1. All correlations were statistically significant at p < .001 (N = 213)

From: Exploring a core psychopathology in disordered eating: the feelings of fat scale

  EDE-Q SFF score Item 1 Item 2 Item 3 Item 4 Item 5 Item 6 Item 7
SFF score .816         
1. I feel that my clothes are tight .553 .715        
2. I feel that my stomach is distended .673 .814 .586       
3. I feel that my face is round and chubby .634 .801 .511 .629      
4. I feel my thighs are thick and heavy .687 .857 .563 .619 .607     
5. I feel my entire body is wide .737 .913 .547 .670 .682 .754    
6. I feel big .777 .933 .584 .714 .667 .769 .886   
7. I feel fat .791 .920 .579 .673 .668 .762 .858 .906  
Mean 2.26 3.18 2.59 3.27 3.28 3.79 3.11 3.05 3.19
SD 1.32 1.50 1.42 1.60 1.81 1.86 1.86 1.86 1.88
  1. Note. This table reports Pearson product-moment correlations, as are all the correlations reported in this paper. Spearman correlations would have tested the hypothesis of monotonicity rather than linearity (see de Winter, Gosling, & Potter [23], for a discussion). Given that we are using EDE-Q to try to validate SFF, linearity is the appropriate hypothesis to test. In practice, Spearman correlations for this data differ very little from Pearson correlations