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Table 3 Participants’ current and ideal body fat with prevalence of disordered eating attitudes and body mass index for each category

From: Disordered eating attitudes correlate with body dissatisfaction among Kuwaiti male college students

Body fat level (%) Total selections n (%) BMI M (SD) EAT-26 categories
At risk of disordered eating attitudes n (%) Not at risk of disordered eating attitudes n (%) χ2(d.f.), p
Current
 3.5 71 (17.8%) 22.73 (3.66) 23 (31.9%) 49 (68.1%) χ2(5) = 10.20, p < .070
 10 77 (19.3%) 22.81 (3.44) 33 (42.9%) 44 (57.1%)
 16.5 99 (24.8%) 24.78 (3.5) 48 (48.5%) 51 (51.5%)
 23 95 (23.8%) 27.89 (3.8) 50 (52.6%) 45 (47.4%)
 29.5 48 (12%) 31.65 (5.58) 25 (52.1%) 23 (47.9%)
 36 9 (2.3%) 34.88 (11.58) 6 (66.7%) 3 (33.3%)
Ideal
 3.5 122 (30.5%) 25.04 (5.00) 62 (50.8%) 60 (49.2%) χ2(4) = 4.56, p < .335
 10 169 (42.2%) 25.73 (5.19) 73 (43.2%) 96 (56.8%)
 16.5 77 (19.2%) 26.96 (5.63) 39 (50.6%) 38 (49.4%)
 23 31 (7.8%) 26.63 (6.01) 11 (35.5%) 20 (64.5%)
 29.5 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)
 36 1 (0.2%) 26.7 0 (0.0%) 1 (100%)
  1. BMI body mass index, EAT-26 eating attitudes test. Pearson’s chi-squared test was used to compare the prevalence of the risk of disordered eating between groups in relation to current and ideal levels of body fat